Japan Lecture Series 2005-2006

 

Lyon College, Batesville, Arkansas  


Koto Music of Japan: Traditional to Modern

By Dr. Anne Prescott

October 27, 2005

 

Ritual and Popular Protest: A Different Look at Japanese Festivals

By Dr. Scott Schnell

February 23, 2006

 

Free admission

 

The Japan Lecture Series is made possible by the grant from the Freeman Foundation.            

For more information, contact Mieko U. Peek at mpeek@lyon.edu


 

 

Koto Music of Japan: Traditional to Modern

By Dr. Anne Prescott

7:00 – 8:30 P.M.

Thursday, October 27, 2005

Bevens Music Room

 

 

Dr. Anne Prescott received her B.M.Ed. from Cornell College and her M.M. and Ph.D. from Kent State University. Dr. Prescott has been playing the koto (13 string instrument) for more than 20 years. She spent eight years in Japan studying the koto and shamisen, including one year as a Japanese Ministry of Education scholar at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music. While in Japan, Dr. Prescott performed regularly in the Tokyo area, including in a concert attended by Empress Michiko. In the U.S. she has given numerous performances at schools, museums, universities and other venues. Dr. Prescott is currently an outreach coordinator at the East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University.  She was previously on the faculty at Augustana College where she taught East Asian music, Japanese culture, and the koto, and directed the Augustana Koto Ensemble. Dr. Prescott’s publications include “The Donkey’s Ears Go Flop, Flop: Miyagi Michio’s Koto Works for Children” in Asian Music and a Japan Digest article on koto music for the National Clearinghouse for US-Japan Studies. She recently conducted the third “Teaching East Asian Music in the Elementary Classroom” summer workshop at Indiana University.

 

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Ritual and Popular Protest: A Different Look at Japanese Festivals

By Dr. Scott Schnell

7:00 – 8:30 P.M.

Thursday, February 23, 2006

Derby Lecture Hall

 

 

Dr. Scott Schnell received his M.A. and Ph.D. in anthropology from the Ohio State University. He also has master’s degrees in Natural Resources and East Asian Languages and Literatures. He is currently associate professor of anthropology at the University of Iowa where he teaches courses on cultural ecology, the anthropology of religion, ritual and performance, and Japanese society and culture. His research interests include social organization and conflict, ritual and sociopolitical change, popular religion and the conceptualization of nature, historical ethnography, and expressive culture. He has been both a Fulbright scholar and a visiting research fellow at the Japanese National Museum of Ethnology. He is the author of The Rousing Drum: Ritual Practice in a Japanese Community (University of Hawai’i Press, 1999), which explores the use of ritual as an effective medium for negotiating sociopolitical and economic change.


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